From the monthly archives:

July 2009

“I’ve thought
about this
quite a bit,
sir,

and I would have
to say
considering
what’s waiting
out there
for me

I don’t want
to sell anything
buy anything
or process
anything –
as a
career.

I don’t want
to sell anything
bought
or processed.

Buy anything
sold
or processed

or
process anything
sold
bought –
or processed,

or repair anything
sold
bought
or processed.

You know,
as a career:
I don’t want
to do that.”

– Lloyd Dobler (played by John Cusack) in Say Anything, outlining the aversions that led him to choose a career in kickboxing.

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Invertebrate Art

July 29, 2009

in Image,Senses,Video

Bugs in lights, filmed with long exposures, reveal their true nature as abstract expressionists:

flight patterns from Charlie McCarthy on Vimeo.

via Andrew Sullivan

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Annie Dillard, in The Writing Life:

“One of the few things I know about writing is this: spend it all, shoot it, play it, lose it, all, right away, every time. Do not hoard what seems good for a later place in the book, or for another book; give it, give it all, give it now. The impulse to save something good for a better place later is the signal to spend it now. Something more will arise for later, something better. These things fill from behind, from beneath, like well water. Similarly, the impulse to keep to yourself what you have learned is not only shameful, it is destructive. Anything you do not give freely and abundantly becomes lost to you. You open your safe and find ashes.”

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I’d love to hear (and see) a gaggle of these moving through a crowded space:

via Today’s BIG Thing

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W.H. Auden, in the essay “Reading” from the collection The Dyer’s Hand:

What is the function of a critic? So far as I am concerned, he can do me one or more of the following services:

  1. Introduce me to authors or works of which I was hitherto unaware.
  2. Convince me that I have undervalued an author or a work because I had not read them carefully enough.
  3. Show me relations between works of different ages and cultures which I could never have seen for myself because I do not know enough and never shall.
  4. Give a “reading” of a work which increases my understanding of it.
  5. Throw light upon the process of artistic “Making.”
  6. Throw light upon the relation of art to life, to science, economics, ethics, religion, etc.

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“The things that make you strong, and make you feel as though you’ve accomplished something, are not the easy ones; it’s the things you had to work and struggle through. Those are what give us our depth—that make us not just gray and plain and nothing, but give us depth and texture and longing.”

Dr. Jerri Nielsen, the emergency-room doctor who discovered she had breast cancer while over-wintering in Antarctica in 1999, died June 23rd. She was 57.

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